A proposal for The Freedom of Migration Act is presented here for public scrutiny. Please do not take even one word at face value; examine my facts and logic. Challenge me, have fun.

Henryk A. Kowalczyk

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Tag Archives: immigration reform

Troubleshooting immigration

What, if instead of proposing how to fix immigration, we first troubleshoot the problem in a similar manner as engineers or business people solve their problems? The opening question is:

How it got started?
Up to about one hundred years ago, almost every European who arrived at our shores was allowed to enter and settle. It is less known that about one-third of those arriving returned home a few years later. By the beginning of the 20th century, the majority of immigrants were from impoverished and overpopulated Eastern and Southern Europe. These mostly illiterate people formed ethnic enclaves in large American cities and became an eyesore to many Americans who were beginning to enjoy the benefits of their newfound prosperity. The federal government was asked to step in.
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Immigration impasse explained

Why is it so hard to reach any reasonable compromise on the immigration issue? It is because faults of our immigration policy are about hundred years old and most of us are accustomed to accept them as unquestioned wisdom. The first comprehensive immigration law in the U.S., the Immigration Act of 1924 bears the sins of the times, which had barely been openly explained and duly criticized.
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It is editors’ fault

Why is it so hard to reach any reasonable consensus on immigration? In 2006, we failed to reform our immigration system. Seven years later things do not look much better. The current Senate Bill S.744 has many vocal opponents, and even its supporters agree that it is just a tiny step in the right direction. Similarly, it seems unlikely that the House will come up with any concept gaining widespread support either. Where is the problem? Let me ask a tricky question: who is more to blame – the Senate or the House? The right answer is: the WSJ editorial page editors. To be precise, the blame is on media in general, in particular on the concept of the editorial writing practiced since the inception of newspapers. In this text I pick on the WSJ as, to the misfortune of the editors there, this is the main paper I read regularly.
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Border security, or BS for short

Something is missing in the passionately debated border security, as a part of the immigration overhaul. Advocates for increased border protection bring up the issue of the nation’s security as the main reason for all the elaborate and expensive border protection provisions. People sneaking throughout the border are mostly low skilled and seeking entry level jobs in the U.S. It is a mystery to me how by picking strawberries at American farms or cutting meat in American slaughterhouses they can endanger the nation’s security.
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Rube Goldberg immigration fix

The Gang of 8 prepared the immigration reform proposal. The intentions are noble. The proposed measures promise improvement, but the concept and mechanics of how it should be done look like a Rube Goldberg masterpiece.
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A few conclusions missing

Several weeks ago a former Florida governor, and potential 2016 presidential candidate, Jeb Bush whizzed throughout the media announcing his new book about immigration, “Immigration Wars. Forging an American Solution”, written together with Clint Bolick from the Goldwater Institute. At that time very few people had a chance to read the book, and a few days later, the book was forgotten. This is unfortunate, as it brings a fresh approach and as such deserves more attention.  We all remember Mitt Romney telling illegal immigrants to return home and get back in line. I argued that there is no line to get into, but now it is official. In the book (page 24), a reputable politician and a respectful scholar confirmed, “there is no line in which most of those aspiring to become Americans can wait with any realistic hope of admission.” In their analysis they detail nonsenses of our “immigration regime that nearly everyone agrees is profoundly dysfunctional.” (Page 6)
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As it is. Can we reform immigration just by calling things as they are?

Heralding the upcoming legislation battle about immigration reform, in her column in the Washington Post, Tamar Jacoby gives us an inside look into the process.

Opting for “comprehensive immigration reform”, Ms. Jacoby carefully avoids defining what it means. As proponents of increased immigration and granting legal status to undocumented immigrants, claim the term “comprehensive”, one may only guess that this is the objective of Ms. Jacoby. However, one can imagine resolving our immigration crisis just by capturing and forcefully deporting all presently undocumented immigrants, by militarizing the borders that even a mouse could not sneak in, and by using Arizona style police methods in chasing and removing those who still manage to come in. This approach, formally, could be called comprehensive as well.
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Neither immigration nor reform

In December 2005, the House of Representatives approved the Border Protection, Antiterrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005, also known as . The Senate did not like this bill, and in May 2006 it approved its own Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2006, also know as S.2611. These documents are worlds apart. Proponents of the House bill say that the Senate bill is bad and should not become a law under any circumstances. Supporters of the Senate draft say that the House bill is evil and should be scrapped. The sad truth is that both sides are one hundred percent right. Politicians are completely lost on this issue.
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